The Camino Finisterre-Muxía – a detailed guide & walking stages

Camino Finisterre (or Fisterra in Galician) is an extension of the the Camino de Santiago that takes pilgrims from Santiago de Compostela to what was once believed to be "the end of the world" or Finisterre. The Finisterre-Muxia route is the only way that starts and ends in Santiago de Compostela. There are two arrival points on this Finisterre and Muxía route, you can choose one of them or walk to both, there is a route (part of the Way) that connects them. In the first 60 km of Santiago, it is the same route, in the Hospital it is divided in two different ways (day 3). Most people take this path after completing one of the longest routes on the Path, we take it after finishing the northern path.

Overview of the Camino Finisterre-Muxía route

  • Distance – Santiago de Finisterra – 89 km / 55 miles, Santiago de Muxía – 86 km / 53 miles, Santiago de Muxía to Finisterra – 115 km / 71 miles, Santiago de Finisterre to Muxía – 118 km / 73 miles
  • Number of days required – 4-5
  • Starting point – Santiago de Compostela
  • Finishing point – Finisterre or Muxía
  • Average cost – 24 euros per person per day
  • Route marking – yellow shells and arrows
  • Accommodation – public and private hostels, hostels, hotels

If you would like to visit the Finisterre and Muxia cables, but do not want to walk again, you can do a day bus tour of Santiago.

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Cape Finisterre vs Cape Muxía – which one to choose?

It is always difficult to compare places and sights and say which is best. If you have enough time, we suggest visiting both. If you have a choice, go to Cape Finisterre, not because it is better or more beautiful, just because historically it was the end of the journey. Do we like Muxía more mainly because of the climate; we had a terrible day in Finisterre, with stormy winds, torrential rain and a good sunny day in Muxía.

Both points; Finisterre and Muxía has 0km mark whatever you go first, it will end at the 0km point.

More people go to Finisterre including daily visitors and groups arriving by bus; Muxía is less touristy, even in high season, there are significantly fewer people.

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The cable in Muxía is only 10min. walk from the city center compared to a 3 km walk from the city to the point of Finisterre.

has more places of interest in Muxía; sanctuary of Nossa Senhora da Barca, A Ferida monument, Pidera de Abalar, Piedra dos Cadrís, viewpoint of Monte Corpiño.

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The real cable in Muxía is more spacious compared to the people of Finisterre scattered throughout the area – it doesn't look overcrowded.

The city of Muxía is quite picturesque; located on a small peninsula between the sea and the rocky hill, you can have a great view from the top of the Monte Corpiño viewpoint. There are some beautiful beaches around the city.

If you decide walk to the colon we suggest going Muxía first and from there to Finisterre; first, because there are more bus options to Santiago de Finisterra than from Muxía. Second, because if you have some time, you can go (walk or take a bus) from Finisterre to Corcubión (14 km) and from there take a taxi and visit the beautiful Ézaro Waterfalls, 20 km from Corcubión.

There's one daily bus that will between Finistère and Muxía if you don't want to walk anymore, you can always catch it.

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There are two main guides to the Finisterre-Muxía Way; Pilgrims' Guide to the English Caminos: & Camino Finisterre, including the Múxia Circuit (Camino Guides) by John Brierly, 2019 edition. This guide includes the Camino Ingles and the Camino Finisterre-Muxía routes. Camino Finisterre; Santiago de Compostela – Finistère – Muxía by David Landis, 2018 edition.

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Route map of the Finisterre-Muxia route.

Practical information for planning the Camino Finisterre

Most of the people walk along the Camino Finisterre after completing one of the routes, but you can walk as a separate hike, starting or ending in Santiago. The route is marked in both directions.

The route is marked very well, there are several accommodation options along the way where you definitely don't need a company to plan your hike.

Being part of the Camino de Santiago pilgrimage route network The The Finisterre route has municipal hostels which are exclusively for pilgrims. To stay there, you need to show your credential. The credential is a certificate that confirms that you are a pilgrim. Every pilgrim needs one, in each hostel you stay (municipal and private) your credential is stamped, some churches, restaurants and bars along the way also have stamps.

Only people who walk, cycle or ride a horse (which we’ve never seen on any of the Caminos) are considered pilgrims. If you arrive in Finisterre by bus, even if you have just walked any other way, you will not be able to stay in a municipal hostel.

Hostels / private hostels are for everyone regardless of whether you walked there or took the bus.

For completing the Finisterre-Muxía Way (on foot, on horseback or by bicycle), you can obtain two certificates similar to o Compostela; the Finisterrana at the information office in Finisterre and the Muxiana at the municipal hostel in Muxía.

A landmark marking the end of the Finisterre Way, 0 km
A landmark in Cape Finisterre marking kilometer 0 of the Camino de Santiago

Travel insurance for the Way

Walking like any other outdoor activity involves the risk of suffering an injury or losing part of the equipment. It is always recommended to have travel insurance when you leave. The Camino Finisterre is not an exclusion, although it is not a high altitude hike in remote areas and its distance is quite short compared to the other Camino routes, it is still a physically challenging experience. It's good to know that your insurance will cover you in the event of an unforeseen emergency, whether it's an injury, loss of gear or device failure. Let your insurance company worry about you and your stuff while you enjoy walking the Path.

Best months to walk to Finisterre

We walked on the Camino Finisterre in November and, for the most part, it rained a few times very hard and the day we arrived in Finisterre was terrible; strong wind, heavy rain, poor visibility. Based on our experience at Camino and the guidance of local residents (April-June and September) is the best time; few people, the weather is still good (neither too hot nor too rainy). At the October you can be lucky and not get too much rain or bad luck and walk all the way in the rain. The hottest months in Galicia are July and Augustthe busiest time when there are thousands of people everywhere. If you plan to hike these months, we suggest you book in advance. Low season November to March climate is not the best time to walk to Finisterre; it's very cold, it rains a lot, very few pilgrims, many places are closed for the off season.

Temperature graph showing low and high temperatures (in degrees Celsius) in Galicia every month
Average high and low temperatures in Galicia throughout the year
Temperature table with high and low average temperature in Galicia in Fahrenheit
Average high and low temperatures in Galicia throughout the year in Fahrenheit
Graph with average rainfall in Galicia for all months and several rainy days
Average rainfall and number of rainy days in Galicia throughout the year

Cost Camino Finisterre-Muxia

Accommodation – all municipal hostels on the route cost 6 euros pp., private hostels cost between 10 and 12 euros (sometimes 14 euros), hotels ‘from 35 euros per double room.

food – Menu del Dia (first course, main course, wine / beer / cold drink, coffee or dessert, bread) – 10 euros; breakfast (coffee with croissant or toast with butter and jam) – 3 euros; English breakfast with coffee – 5 euros; dinner – 10-15 euros, coffee between 1 and 1.5 euros. A supermarket meal (ready-made salads, microwave meals, sandwiches) – between 2.5 and 4 euros.

Transport – Finisterre – Santiago bus – 11 euros; bus Muxía – Santiago – 8 euros.

Laundry – Washing 3 euros, drying 3 euros.

Our budget breakdown (2 people, 6 days)

  • Accommodation – 120 euros, we stayed in municipal and private hostels and one night in a pension. If you only stay in municipal hostels, your accommodation will cost only 24 euros (4 days) and 30 euros (5 days) per person.
  • Eat out – 45 euros, we do not eat the Menu del Dia, we have breakfast a few times and stop for coffee once a day.
  • Shopping – 100 euros, most of the food we buy in supermarkets.
  • Laundry – 6 euros, washed + dried once.
  • Transport – 16 euros, we took a bus from Muxía to Santiago de Compostela.

Total: 287 euros / 6 days / 2 people or 24 euros per person per day.

Our video on the cost of walking the Camino de Santiago

The highlights of the Camino Finisterre

Maceira Bridge

A small picturesque village with an old medieval bridge (14th century) over the river Tambre, a waterfall, not too big but beautiful, the chapel of San Brais and some old houses – a great place to stop for coffee or lunch. scenario.

Corcubion

A charming seaside town, with a beautiful beach with cobbled streets, the Gothic church of San Marcos and some street cafes. If you plan to stop before Finisterre, we recommend staying in Corcubión for one night.

Finisterre

The city of Finisterre is full of hotels, hostels, restaurants, bars and souvenir shops. It is good to stay here for a night or two, but it is not the kind of place we would like to stay longer. Cape Finisterre is 3 km from the city, the walk is beautiful; along the coast, with stunning views, especially if you are lucky with the weather.

To not lose

  • Santa Maria de Areas Church on the way from the city to the lighthouse
  • Finisterre Lighthouse
  • 0 km mark
  • The bronze sculpture of the boot
  • There is a tradition of burning an old piece of clothing or shoes in the boot sculpture. We didn't (it was very windy and rainy), but if you decide to do that, make sure you don't leave any traces and trash behind.
  • Another tradition is to take a dip or a quick dip in the ocean, you can do it on one of the beaches on the way.
The lighthouse of Cape Finisterre on the cliff surrounded by the sea
The lighthouse of Cape Finisterre, end of the Finisterre-Muxía Way

Muxía

We like Muxía more than Finisterre; in our opinion, there are more things to do and visit here. The city itself is more picturesque and the nearby hills offer excellent views of Muxía and the surrounding beaches.

To not lose

  • Sanctuary of Nosa Señora da Barca – says that & # 39; Nossa Senhora & # 39; appeared here for Saint Jacques, the sanctuary was built in 1719.
  • Sunset at the sanctuary
  • Piedra de Abalar – according to tradition, pilgrims dive 9 times under the massive rock (facing the sea).
  • The Wound – a stone sculpture that symbolizes a wound (damage) that was done to the ecosystem when 66,000 tons of oil were spilled after a huge tanker broke off the coast of Muxia in 2002.
  • the km sign
  • Mirador O Corpiño, at the top of the hill
The sunset colored the sky and the sea in bright yellow and orange
Beautiful sunset at Cabo Muxia, at the end of the Way

Camino Finisterre accommodation

There are many hostels on the Way, almost every city or town has one. As with any other route on the Camino, there are two types of hostels: municipal (public) and private hostels.

Municipal (public) hostels on the Finisterre Way

Municipal hostels are administered by the municipality, cost 6 euros per person, per bed. These hostels are exclusively for credential pilgrims. Municipal hostels open for check-in between 13:00 and 13:30. The doors are usually closed after 10 pm, if you go out for dinner or a drink, be sure to go back in time. You must leave the municipal hostels before 8 am the next morning. You can stay in a municipal hostel for just one night. All Camino Finisterre municipal hostels are open all year.

In Camino Finisterre, municipal hostels are in very good condition and often even better than private hostels (they have a fully equipped kitchen, heating, clean, large and spacious). We stayed in the municipality and in the private (or we just went to check some of them) and we found the municipal hostels very good.

Public (municipal) hostels on the Camino Finisterre can be found at

  • Negreira – 21 km from Santiago
  • Olveiroa – 54 km from Santiago
  • Dumbria – 65 km from Santiago
  • Muxía – 86 km from Santiago
  • Finisterre – 89 km from Santiago

Private hostels on the route

Private hostels are more like hostels where anyone can stay. The cost is between 10 and 14 Euros pp. Private hostels are more flexible, they can allow you to check in early and check out later. They are generally smaller and have better facilities, although on this Camino route public hostels are really good.

Public versus private hostels on the Camino Finisterre

ResourcesPublic hostelsPrivate hostels
Price6 Euro10-14 Euro
Only for pilgrimsYesNo
Need the credentialYesNo
Can be bookedNoYes
Accept baggage deliveryNoYes
Allow to stay more than 1 nightNoYes
Comparing public and private hostels on the Camino Finisterre

Supermarkets on route

Few towns / cities on the way have a supermarket or at least a store, which makes it a little difficult if you follow a special diet or on a tight budget and don't want to eat out. Supermarkets and shops on the route usually close on Sundays.

You can find supermarkets at

  • Negreira – in some large supermarkets, we recommend stocking up here, the next supermarket (store) that you will only have on the third day of walking.
  • Olveiroa – a small store with very few things.
  • Dumbría – a small grocery store in the restaurant.
  • Cee – the largest city in the region, many supermarkets, shops, bakeries, etc.
  • Corcubion – one or two stores, it is basically a city with Cee, you can always walk there to shop.
  • Finisterre – some supermarkets and shops.
  • Muxia – some supermarkets and shops.

Packing list for the Camino de Santiago

This route is very short and you don't have to bring many things. Many pilgrims leave their large backpacks at the hotel in Santiago and walk the Camino Finisterre with a backpack. As an option, you can use the backpack transport service and bring the material you want.

Some items are suggested for the route:

  • A bathing suit (women)/Beach shorts (men) if you walk to Finisterre in the summer, you may need some nice beaches for both layers.
  • A cap or a hat for the summer it is a must-have at Camino.
  • Flip flops, taking off your walking shoes and putting on slippers is one of the highlights of the Camino de Santiago. Slippers will also be great to wear on the beach.
  • A quick-drying towel, a mandatory item if you plan to stay in hostels.
  • A bottle of water, we drink tap water on the Finisterre Way, but if for some reason you don't want to, you can use a water filter.
  • A rain poncho, it will be very useful if you walk the Way in spring / autumn, although, from our experience in Galicia, it can rain at any time.
  • A Kindle, we always take ours on the way. It's great to relax and read a good book after a long day of walking. Of course, you can bring a paper book, but it is good to have several book options.

You can find the complete list of packages for different seasons for men and women in our Camino de Santiago post packing list.

Books to read on the Way

If you like to read, check out the Amazon Kindle Unlimited Program to get free access to hundreds of thousands of Ebooks and audiobooks. You don't even need a Kindle that you can read on any device. Many of the suggested Camino books are free with the Kindle Unlimited program.

Campbell and Alya on the Muxia cape at sunset
Petty nomads at Cape Muxia after completing the Finisterre-Muxia Way in November

Baggage delivery service on the Finisterre Trail

As with any other route on the Camino, it is possible to organize luggage delivery service on the Camino Finisterre-Muxia. The delivery service is very simple in the morning, when you leave your backpack or suitcase at the reception in a private hotel hostel, a car picks you up and takes you to the next place of accommodation. When you arrive, your luggage is already there. The average price is 4-5 euros per backpack per stage. It is important to remember that public hostels generally do not allow baggage delivery. If you decide to use this service, you will probably need to stay in private hostels and hotels.

There are several companies that offer luggage delivery service on the way to Finisterre and Muxía. Three main companies are Correos, Pilbeoand Camino Facil.

Santiago de Compostela, the beginning of the route

The Finisterre-Muxía Camino is the only Camino route that starts and ends in Santiago. Most pilgrims walk as an extension after completing one of the other routes. As I already mentioned, we walked to Finisterre after finishing the Northern Way. I definitely recommend staying in Finisterre if you have time, especially after completing one of the long routes inland, for example. the French Way or the Via da Prata. After walking for 30 to 40 days through the arid landscape and endless fields, it is very good to reach the sea.

It is up to you to stay a few days in Santiago before you start walking again or continue walking the next day after arriving in the city. We didn't have much time and started walking the next day, but if you have time, it may be good to spend a day or two exploring Santiago and enjoying delicious local food. There are many sights and interesting places to visit in the city.

Tours and activities in Santiago de Compostela

Places to stay in Santiago

Gothic cathedral of St. James illuminated by the sun
The Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela, the starting point of the Way of Finisterre at sunset

The Finisterre-Muxía Way – our 4-day itinerary

This itinerary is the most economical way to walk the Way, because you stay every night in a municipal hostel for 6 euros.

Day 1. Santiago de Compostela to Negreira, 21 km / 13 mi

The Way begins at the Cathedral; from Obradoiro square, follow Rua das Hortas, the street on the right that passes through Hotel Reyes Catolicos. You will start to see yellow arrows painted on the asphalt (although the arrows are a little faded), follow the arrows. Cross Rua do Pombal (busy street) and follow Rua da Poza de Bar. After about 1 km from the cathedral, in the Caballeria de San Lorenzo Park, you will see the first post away. From there, the route is well marked with distance poles.

Finisterre Trail - stage 1 Santiago de Compostela - Negreira, altitude profile
Camino Finisterre altitude profile – stage 1 Santiago de Compostela – Negreira

Points of interest

  • Parque Caballeria de San Lorenzo (here you can find the first distance)
  • The medieval bridge over the Roxos River
  • The Baroque church of Trasmonte
  • A beautiful city of Ponte Maceira; a small waterfall, an old medieval bridge, the Carmen chapel surrounded by picturesque green hills – a good place to stop for coffee or lunch.
  • Pazo de Cotón – a medieval fort in Negreira (just outside the city, on the way to the municipal hostel).

Challenges

  • The first 1 km of the way through the city are not very well marked
  • Slight ascents and descents all the way
  • A long and steep climb after 12 km, an altitude gain of 220 m

Negreira

It is a very big city, if you need to withdraw money, buy medicine or buy food, this is the place to do it. There will be no supermarkets or stores until Cee (if you go to Finisterre) or until Dumbría (if you go to Muxía).

  • ATM – yes
  • Municipal hostel – yes, about 1 km from the city, we suggest bringing food, there is a large Gadis supermarket on the way.
  • Private hostel – yes
  • Hotel – yes
  • Supermarket – yes
  • Store – yes
  • Pharmacy – yes
  • Restaurant / bar – yes

Municipal hostel in Negreira

A pleasant place, about 1 km outside the city. Capacity – 22 beds, price 6 euros.

installations

  • Shower with hot water – yes
  • Kitchen – yes, with microwave, kitchenware, refrigerator, pots, pans, plates, cutlery, etc.
  • Wi-fi – yes, to connect you need a local (European) phone number
  • Washing machine – no, hand wash basins
  • Dryer – no
  • Blankets – yes, just a few
  • Heating – yes, we stayed in November and it was warm inside
  • Extra – coffee and snack vending machine
  • Location – 4 out of 5, just 30 m away from the route, but far from the city, shops, restaurants, etc.
  • Comfort – 5 of 5

More places to stay in Negreira

A stone bridge at Ponte Maceira on the first day of the Camino walk
A picturesque village of Ponte Maceira, Camino Finisterre-Muxía

Day 2. Negreira to Olveiroa, 33 km / 20.5 mi

A pleasant walk through the forest at the beginning, after a few hours, changes to the rural setting, with many small villages, pasture fields, famous Galician barns and hundreds of cows. The route continues up and down all the way. From Negreira, there are several bars-hostels, finding a place to stop for coffee, breakfast or lunch will not be a problem. We stopped for coffee in A Pena, about 8 km from the municipal hostel. Note! There will be no shops / supermarkets on the way.

Camino Finisterre - stage 2 Negreira - Olveiroa, altitude profile
Camino Finisterre – stage 2 Negreira – Olveiroa, altitude profile

Points of interest

  • The granaries of As Maroñas
  • The old church in Santa Mariña
  • Church of San Cristovo de Corzón
  • Monte Aro (556m) from the top you can see a large part of the region and the sea
  • Olveiroa Bridge – a bridge built in the 16th century

Challenges

  • Long but gradual ascent, 150m high, starting at the municipal hostel
  • Some parts of the road can get a little muddy if it rains a lot

Olveiroa

A small village with a few bars and hostels.

  • ATM – no
  • Municipal hostel – yes
  • Private hostel – yes
  • Hotel – yes
  • Supermarket – no
  • Shop – yes, a very small grocery store with few things
  • Pharmacy – no
  • Restaurant / bar – yes

Municipal hostel in Olveiroa

Capacity – 46 beds, price 6 euros.

installations

  • Shower with hot water – yes
  • Kitchen – yes, with microwave, kitchen dishes, refrigerator, very few dishes, cups, cutlery.
  • Wi-fi – yes, to connect you need a local (European) phone number
  • Washing machine – no, hand wash basins
  • Dryer – no
  • Blankets – yes
  • Heating – yes
  • Location – 5 out of 5, 50m from the route, close to bars
  • Comfort – 4 out of 5, not good cuisine

More places to stay in Olveiroa

Day 3 (option 1). Olveiroa to Muxía, 32.5 km / 20 mi

Today you have to decide to go to Muxía first and then to Finisterre or another route (if you plan to visit both, of course). As I mentioned above, I recommend going first to Muxía and ending in Finisterre. The walk from Olveiroa to Muxía is a little shorter – 32 km vs 35 km to Finisterre.

A long day of walking through the fields, forests, small villages with many hills along the way. After 5 km from Olveiroa, at the Hospital, the route is divided in two; the right goes to Muxia and the left continues to Finistère. We walked on both sides (we did the entire Hospital-Finisterre-Muxia-Dumbira route) and I can say that the scenery on both sides is quite similar, except on the way to Finisterre, you pass Corcubión – a beautiful coastal city, from Corcubión to Finisterre, you pass by several beaches. On the way to Muxía, you can see the longest granary in Galicia, granary of San Mariño de Ozon.

Camino Finisterre - stage 3 Olveiroa - Muxia, altitude profile
Camino Finisterre – stage 3 Olveiroa – Muxia, altitude profile

Points of interest

  • Church of Santa Baia de Dumbría
  • Chapel of Santiño de Espiño
  • The granary of San Martiño de Ozón, the longest granary in Spain – 27m long.
  • Church of San Xulián de Moraime
  • Muxía

Challenges

  • An easy walking day, with small climbs and descents

Muxía

A nice little town, where you can find all services, a good place for seafood lovers, there are two restaurants serving local seafood, including the famous squash (octopus).

  • ATM – yes
  • Municipal hostel – yes
  • Private hostel – yes
  • Hotel – yes
  • Supermarket – yes, closed on Sundays
  • Store – yes
  • Pharmacy – yes
  • Restaurant / bar – yes

Municipal hostel in Muxía

Capacity – 32 beds, price 6 euros. Here you can get your Muxiana, a certificate similar to Compostela that confirms that you have completed the Muxía Way.

installations

  • Shower with hot water – yes
  • Kitchen – yes, microwave, dishes, cups, pans, cutlery, etc.
  • Wi-fi – yes, to connect you need a local (European) phone number
  • Washing machine – no, place to wash your hands
  • Dryer – no, washing lines
  • Blankets – yes
  • Heating – yes, but it was turned off in November when we were there, it was very cold inside
  • Location – 5 out of 5, on route to Finisterre, 5 min. walk to supermarkets and restaurants.
  • Extras – each bed has a closet (works with 1 euro coin)
  • Comfort – 4 out of 5 if the heating was on I would give 5

More places to stay in Muxía

The Ozon granary in Galicia on the walking route to Muxia
The Ozon granary, the longest granary in Galicia. On the way from Olveiro to Muxía

Day 3 (option 2). Olveiroa to Finisterre, 32 km / 20 mi

After 5 km at the Hospital, you will see a division, turn left towards Finisterre. Note! The next place after the bar at the Hospital (quite expensive), where you can get food or coffee, is in Cee, 15 km away. If you don't want to walk 32 km to Finisterre, you can stop after 21 km in Cee or Corcubión. The next morning, you can continue walking to Finisterre, another 11 km.

Cape Finisterre is about 3 km from the city, it is 6 km more to walk and return. You can check in, have lunch, leave your backpack in its place and walk to Finisterre.

If you don't plan to walk to Muxía, you can take a bus from Finisterre to Santiago de Compostela, there are 4 to 6 buses daily (depending on the day of the week).

Finisterre Path - stage 3 Olveiroa - Finisterre, altitude profile
Finisterre Path – stage 3 Olveiroa – Finisterre, altitude profile

Points of interest

  • Sanctuary of A Nosa Señora das Neves and its “sacred fountain” about 2 km after the Hospital
  • Chapel of St. Peter Martyr
  • The Navy Squad
  • Cee – the largest city in the region, with many restaurants, bars, bakeries, etc. A beautiful church in A Xunqueira, several nice buildings.
  • Corcubión – a small town next to Cee, with a beautiful beach, cobbled streets, San Marcos church.
  • Talón cove – a small and beautiful beach
  • The long sand dunes and beach of Playa Langosteira
  • Finisterre

Challenges

  • Long distance – 35km
  • A relatively easy walk, mostly flat, with a long descent from Cruceiro da Armada to Cee.

Finisterre

Uma cidade turística com muitos restaurantes, bares, hotéis, albergues e lojas.

  • ATM – sim
  • Albergue municipal – sim
  • Albergue particular – sim
  • Hotel – yes
  • Supermarket – yes
  • Shop – yes
  • Pharmacy – yes
  • Restaurant/bar – yes

Municipal albergue in Finisterre

Capacity – 36 beds, price 6 Euro. The albergue is fine but if you finish the Camino in Finisterre it might be worth staying at one of the private albergues or even treat yourself with a more comfortable staying at a hotel or guest house. There are many options in the town from 10 Euro.

Facilities

  • Hot water shower – yes
  • Kitchen – yes, microwave, cooking plates, pots, plates, cutlery, etc.
  • Wi-fi – yes, to connect you need a local (European) phone number
  • Washing machine – yes
  • Drier – yes
  • Blankets – yes
  • Heating – yes
  • Location – 5 out of 5, at the center, on the route, close to the supermarket, tourism office, and restaurants.
  • Comfort – 4 out of 5, few toilets and showers

More places to stay in Finisterre

It’s possible to stay at the very cape Finisterre, next to the Lighthouse at Hotel O Semaforo. It’s quite pricey but the location and the scenery around are truly spectacular. It’s a small and cozy hotel with beautifully designed rooms, breathtaking views, and a nice restaurant.

Day 4. Muxía to Finisterre/Finisterre to Muxía, 29km/18 miles

The route is marked in both directions. The trail takes you through the beautiful forest, past some amazing beaches, green hills, etc. The walk to Finisterre starts at the municipal albergue de Muxía and follows the coast for 2-3 km and then turns inland. The only place on the way where you can find food (restaurants) is a small town of Lires, 15 km from Muxía and 14 km from Finisterre.

There are a couple of hotels and guest houses in Lires if you have time and don’t feel like walking 29 km in one day you can stay here. The actual Cape Finisterre is 3 km away from the town, as an option, you can check into albergue/guesthouse, leave there your backpack and walk the last 3 km (6km return) without extra weight.

If you have some time left you can walk or catch a bus from Finisterre to Corcubión, 14 km away and from there take a taxi to the beautiful Ézaro waterfalls, about 10 km away.

To get to the route from Finisterre first walk out of the town (the same way you came in) towards Playa Langosteira, at the road split turn left (don’t go down to the beach) and follow the street till you see Restaurante Asador on the left, in front of the restaurant there is a sign “Muxía”. After that, the route is marked all the way to Muxía. The cape in Muxía with the sanctuary O Barca is just outside the town, 10 min. walk.

Camino Finisterre - stage 4 Muxia - Finisterre, altitude profile
Camino Finisterre – stage 4 Muxia – Finisterre, altitude profile

Points of interest

  • The beach of Lourido
  • Churches Santa Locaia de Frixe and Santa Maria de Morquintian in Lires
  • The beach of O Rostro

Challenges

  • One long ascend (if you walk from Muxía it’s steeper, coming from Finisterre side it’s very gradual), 200m altitude gain
  • Many smallish up and down hills
  • Only one place in the middle to stop for food
A view of the wild beach surrounded by the hills from the Camino route
A beautiful wild beach at O Rostro, on the way from Muxía to Finisterre

The Camino-Finisterre Muxía – a 5-day itinerary

If you have enough time and walking 30+km a day sounds too much you can walk the route from Santiago to Finisterre/Muxía in 4 days + 1 day to walk from Muxía to Finisterre or vice-versa, in total it will take 5 days to complete the route.

Day 1. Santiago to Negreira, 21 km/13 miles

The first day of this itinerary is the same as the day one of the 4-day itinerary.

Day 2. Negreira to As Maroñas, 22 km/13,6 mi or to Lago, 27 km/17 mi

If you’re walking to Finisterre first than it’s better to walk 27 km to Lago to make the next walking day to Corcubión shorter. If you’re going first to Muxía it’s better to stop at As Maroñas or Santa Mariña.

As Maroñas and Santa Mariña are two small villages 1km apart. The private albergues in both villages are quite good though one in Santa Mariña doesn’t have a kitchen. As an option this day you can walk 6km further and stop at Lago, the private albergue there is nicer and the restaurant is better.

Points of interest

  • The granaries of As Maroñas
  • The old church in Santa Mariña

Challenges

  • A long gradual ascend, 150m altitude gain that starts from the municipal albergue de Negreira
  • Some parts of the road might be a bit muddy if it rains a lot

As Maroñas/Santa Mariña

Two villages 1km apart, each has an albergue and a bar, Santa Mariña has a bakery (closed on Sundays).

  • ATM – no
  • Municipal albergue – no
  • Private albergue – yes, 2 private albergues in the village
  • Hotel – no
  • Supermarket – no
  • Shop – no, only a bakery
  • Pharmacy – no
  • Restaurant/bar – yes

Lago (Mazaricos)

A tiny place not even a village with a nice private albergue, two restaurants and not much else.

  • ATM – no
  • Municipal albergue – no
  • Private albergue – yes
  • Hotel – no
  • Supermarket – no
  • Shop – no
  • Pharmacy – no
  • Restaurant/bar – yes

Places to stay in Lago

It’s a lovely and comfortable place in a small village with a restaurant next door. Capacity 30 beds.

Facilities

  • Hot water shower – yes
  • Kitchen – yes, microwave, fridge, plates, cup, cutlery
  • Wi-fi – yes
  • Washing machine – yes
  • Drier – yes
  • Blankets – yes
  • Heating – yes
  • Extra – lockers, individual lights, and sockets
  • Location – 5 out of 5
  • Comfort – 5 out of 5

Day 3 (option 1, Muxía). As Maroñas/Santa Mariña to Dumbría, 22,5 km/14 mi

The bar at As Maroñas opens only at 9 am if you’re planning to start walking earlier you can stop at Lago for breakfast, 6km, Monte Aro restaurant has different options including eggs and bacon.

Points of interest

  • Church of San Cristovo de Corzón
  • Mount Aro (556m) from the top you can see a big part of the region and the sea
  • Ponte Olveiroa – a bridge built in the 16th century
  • Church of Santa Baia de Dumbría

Challenges

A moderate easy walking day with several up and down hills, nothing too hectic.

Dumbría

A bigger village than the previous two with some infrastructure.

  • ATM – yes
  • Municipal albergue – yes
  • Private albergue – no
  • Hotel – yes
  • Supermarket – no
  • Shop – yes, a grocery store at the bar
  • Pharmacy – yes
  • Restaurant/bar – yes

Public albergue in Dumbria (Albergue O Conco)

Capacity – 26 beds, price 6 Euro. The albergue big, new, and spacious. I’d say it’s the best albergue on the Camino Finisterre.

Facilities

  • Hot water shower – yes
  • Kitchen – yes, with all you need for cooking; microwave, cooking plates, plates, pots, cups, cutlery.
  • Wi-fi – yes, to connect you need a local (European) phone number
  • Washing machine – no, basins for handwashing
  • Drier – no, there are washing lines
  • Blankets – yes
  • Heating – yes
  • Location – 4 out of 5, on the route about 10min. walk from the bar/shop
  • Comfort – 5 out of 5

More places to stay in Dumbría

A small Galician church on the way to Muxia
A small beautiful church on the route to Muxia

Day 3 (option 2, Finisterre). Lago to Cee/Corcubión, 27,5 km/17 mi

The route splits 11km from Lago, at Hospital. Note! The bar at Hospital is the last food place, the next one is only in Cee, 15km away.

Points of interest

  • Ponte Olveiroa – a bridge built in the 16th century
  • Sanctuary of A Nosa Señora das Neves and its “holy fountain” about 2km after Hospital
  • Chapel of San Pedro Mártir
  • O Cruzeiro da Armada
  • Cee – the biggest town in the area with many restaurants, bars, bakeries, etc. A beautiful church of A Xunqueira, several nice buildings.
  • Corcubión – a smallish town next to Cee with a nice beach, cobblestone streets, church of San Marcos.

Chalenges

  • A relatively easy walk, mostly flat with one long descent from Cruceiro da Armada to Cee.

Cee/Corcubión

  • ATM – yes
  • Municipal albergue – no
  • Private albergue – yes
  • Hotel – yes
  • Supermarket – yes
  • Shop – yes
  • Pharmacy – yes
  • Restaurant/bar – yes

Places to stay in Cee/Corcubión

Day 4 (option 1). Dumbría to Muxía, 20,5 km/12,7 mi

There will be a couple of places on the way to stop for breakfast, coffee or lunch, the first one in 5km.

Points of interest

  • Chapel de Santiño de Espiño
  • The granary of San Martiño de Ozón, the longest granary in Spain – 27m long.
  • Church of San Xulián de Moraime
  • Muxía

Challenges

  • An easy walking day, with slight up and down hills

Places to stay in Muxía

There is a good public albergue in the town for 6 Euro for more information go to the 4-day itinerary.

Day 4 (option 2). Cee/Corcubión to Finisterre, 14,5 km/9 mi

As an option after visiting the Cape of Finisterre, you can keep walking towards Muxía and stop at Lires which is 13km away. There are a couple of hostels and guest houses as well as restaurants and bars but no shops.

Points of interest

The cove of Talón – a small beautiful beachThe long beach and sand dunes of Playa LangosteiraFinisterre cape

Challenges

  • An easy and short walking day

Places to stay in Finisterre

There is a public albergue in the town for 6 Euro. For more details go to the 4-day itinerary.

Day 5. Muxía to Finisterre/Finisterre to Muxía, 29 km/18 mi

This day is the same as the day four of the 4-day itinerary.

The town of Muxia and its harbor from the view-point at Monte Carpiño
The view of the town of Muxía from the lookout point Monte Carpiño

How to get back to Santiago from Finisterre & Muxía?

Getting from Finisterre to Santiago

There are direct buses to Santiago from both towns. 6 or 4 daily buses from Finisterre, the journey takes between 2.15min. and 3 hours (depending on the route and stops). Bus leaves from the bus stop around the corner from the municipal albergue. Price 11 Euro pp. paid on the bus. Bus company Monbus check on the site for the current departure times and prices. Note! In search box “Departure point” type “Fisterra”, the Galician name of the town.

Bus Finisterre-Santiago timetable

Time/daysMon-FriSatSun
Bus Finisterre – Santiago8.20
9.459.459.45
11.4511.4511.45
15.0015.00
16.4516.4516.45
19.0019.0019.00
Daily buses from Finisterre to Santiago de Compostela

Getting from Muxía to Santiago

From Muxía it takes between 1h35min. and 2 hours to get to Santiago, price 8 Euro, paid on the bus. Bus company Grupo Ferrin. The bus leaves from Cafeteria Don Quijote, second stop at the bar O’Xardin. Note! There is a direct bus from Muxía to A Coruña in the morning as well.

Time/daysMon-FriSatSun
Bus Muxía – Santiago6.45
7.307.30
14.3014.30
18.45
Daily buses from Muxía to Santiago de Compostela

Camino Finisterre-Muxía route planning resources

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