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Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison is speaking to the media now.

Morrison begins with the usual preamble about the difficulties we all face. He says that state leaders met more in the past two months than in the previous 10 years.

But with restrictions easing after the government's roadmap was released last week, Morrison now says that “the task is really to build that trust and give that momentum, as we move on to the next challenge, which is to redefine the Australian economy to growth to support Australians and their livelihoods in the future ”.

He says today's National Cabinet meeting was informed by the head of the Treasury department, Philip Lowe, head of the Reserve Bank, and Wayne Byres, head of APRA.





































"They threw us into chaos": the Wisconsin blockade decision is the latest in the party war

A conservative majority in the Wisconsin Supreme Court knocked down an order to stay at the Democratic state governor's house on Wednesday, further illustrating the remarkable amount of power Republicans have in the state and how they have was able to contain the authority of its Democratic rivals.

Wisconsin's decision is the most significant legal victory for conservatives, driven by Donald Trump, who is beginning to challenge orders to stay home across the country through protests and legal action. Republican lawmakers in Michigan, where the legislature is extremely gerrymandered, They are also challenger the legal authority of a similar order issued by the Democratic governor of the state there. Other lawsuits from companies that contest requests for stays in other states have not been successful so far.

The decision was the latest in a nasty Wisconsin party battle between Republicans and Democrats that has shaped the past decade. The state is narrowly divided politically and is seen as a crucial state to win in both campaigns in the November presidential election election.










Without support, international students across Australia rely on free food to survive

International students and other temporary visa holders unable to receive support from the federal government rely on food banks and restaurants offering free meals to survive during the coronavirus pandemic.

Images of long lines outside relief services have emerged at international student centers in Sydney and Melbourne, as well as in smaller cities, including Darwin.

Australia has more than 560,000 international students, many of whom supported themselves in part-time or casual jobs while studying.

But when the economy closed and with the federal government refusing to offer direct financial support to temporary visa holders, the queues that form daily from food banks suggest that surprising numbers are now struggling to feed themselves.

National charities say the increase in demand has been huge, driven by an increase in applications from temporary visa holders.



















China marks a month without new coronavirus deaths announced



















This Virginia restaurant, with three Michelin stars, has its own innovative solutions for the new normal:




Mannequins dressed in 1940s clothing sit in the dining area at the Inn at Little Washington, a three-star Michelin restaurant in rural Virginia, Rappahannock County, on May 14, 2020 in Washington, Virginia. "Src =" https: // i. guim.co.uk/img/media/55fabec28b41c7b1353b84fc9f7edd4b253e0fec/0_0_6266_3758/master/6266.jpg?width=300&quality=85&auto=format&fit=max&s=b1b214c3f0e4ccb325ad7

Mannequins dressed in 1940s clothing sit in the dining area at Inn at Little Washington, a three-star Michelin restaurant in rural Virginia, in Rappahannock County, on May 14, 2020 in Washington, Virginia. Photograph: Win McNamee / Getty Images

There, you enjoy a nice meal in a restaurant decorated with three Michelin stars, when you discover something strange. The waiter fills the customer's wine glass sitting next to him. The person does not move, does not blink. They don't even thank the waiter. You are having dinner with a doll. Welcome to dining out in the coronavirus era.

This is the experience that Inn at Little Washington, a restaurant in northern Virginia, is planning for diners, while experiencing what dinner in the Covid-19 pandemic might be like.

With the idea that guests can feel alone eating in a restaurant that can only reach 50% capacity – the maximum required by Virginia's social distance regulations – the restaurant will be placing mannequins in all of its dining rooms.










A pub without a bar: what will a pub visit in the Australian state of New South Wales look like now

In Australia, the state government of New South Wales announced that bars and clubs with kitchens could reopen on May 15, as Covid-19 blockades ease. Restaurants and cafes may reopen on the same date.

But saying that "pubs are reopening" doesn't quite capture the truth of the situation. Bars and pubs will be subject to the same social limits of distance and number of employees from other locations – with 4 square meters of space for each customer, up to a maximum of 10 customers. Pubs and clubs may only open “an on-site dining area” in accordance with the public health order issued on May 14 and can serve alcohol "only if any liquor sold is sold with or in addition to the food served".

The experience most associated with a pub – ordering a beer at the counter – will not return to the menu. "The ability to conduct politics in a pub's front bar is probably still a long way off," John Green, of the Australian Hotel Association, told Guardian Australia:

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